Synagogue in Zamość, Poland


The Renaissance synagogue in the Zamość Old City is one of the most spectacular monuments of Jewish heritage in Poland. The first synagogue in Zamość was built in the 1590s as a wooden structure. In 1610 the current brick building was erected, taking eight years to complete.
During the World War II the synagogue suffered major damage. The Nazis turned the interior into a carpenters’ workshop. Synagogue was rebuilt in the communist period and from 1958 until early in the 20th century the building served as a public library. Recently restored to the Polish Jewish community, the building was renovated. In addition to being available for prayer services, the restored main prayer hall of the synagogue is used for lectures and concerts.
Currently next to the building of the synagogue is the former office of the community from the 18th century. Nearby there is a building of the former Mikveh renovated in the 19th century.

Today only a few Jews live in Zamość. In 1939 there were over 12,000 who made up 45% of the city's population. Of these only 5,000 managed to escape the Holocaust by crossing the Bug River, which in 1939 became the border with the Soviet Union. The Nazis imprisoned those remaining in a ghetto (the Zamość Ghetto), from which they were transported to the Bełżec death camp.
(Learn more: Wikipedia & The "Synagogue" Center & WMF-Renaissance Synagogue in Zamość)


Linked to: Zamość - the ideal city & Great Market Square in Zamość & Zamość Fortress & Afternoon walk around Zamość & Churches in Zamość

Comments

  1. beautiful church with a sad history.

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  2. Wow ... such dramatic and colourful architecture. Fascinating.

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  3. Looks great!

    http://pienilintu.blogspot.fi/2015/01/sydantalvena.html

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  4. I love that the landscapes are veiled in some snow. It really adds a special touch to them. A sad story behind the place though.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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  5. It looks great against the blue sky. Despite its sad history the place seems to be so peaceful.

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  6. Thank you for sharing this! I would love to go to Poland one day and see these sites!

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  7. What an amazing contrast between the blue sky and the white of the snow

    mollyxxx

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  8. I adore Eastern Europe, and Poland is def on my "to do" list. Thanks for sharing at Song-ography!

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  9. Picture perfect! Love the light in your photos. Thanks for linking in with Friday My Town Shoot Out.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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  10. Beautiful building, glad that it has been restored to its original purpose!

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  11. So beautiful - what a marvelous building.
    Won't you please share at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2015/05/tally-ho.html

    ReplyDelete

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